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Ask a numismatist a question...

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Topic: Ask a numismatist a question...
Posted By: silverhawk
Subject: Ask a numismatist a question...
Date Posted: 02 Nov 2006 at 6:53am
Go ahead, ask anything!! Let's keep this post going for awhile...
 
 



Replies:
Posted By: coldshot
Date Posted: 02 Nov 2006 at 6:59am
Why are there type one and type two coin's made in a single year?

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Life is worth the living, Just because he lives


Posted By: coin crazy!!
Date Posted: 02 Nov 2006 at 8:41am
I'm not quite sure if this is but,what is the first U.S. coin?


Posted By: coldshot
Date Posted: 02 Nov 2006 at 9:26am
Fugio the first coin authorized by the new congress?

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Life is worth the living, Just because he lives


Posted By: just carl
Date Posted: 02 Nov 2006 at 9:30am
There are virtually thousands of things I'd like to know about our monitary system that no one appears to know. For instance:
Why no movie stars on our coins like on our stamps?
Why aren't coins made of a material that glows in the dark so you can find them when they fall in my garage?
Why aren't US coins and currency made in denomiations that all stores would be happy with such as $1.99, $2.99, $3.99, etc.?
Who was the Indian that posed for the Indian Head Nickel?
And who was the Buffalo on the reverse of that nickel?
Is there an y significense to why Liberty is either sitting, standing or walking on our coins?
Why is Liberty holding a shield on the Standing Liberty Quarter.?
How many member will there be on this forum in ten years?


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just carl


Posted By: silverhawk
Date Posted: 02 Nov 2006 at 9:33am
Originally posted by coldshot coldshot wrote:

Why are there type one and type two coin's made in a single year?
 
 
Sometimes there are design changes to aid with the striking process. (Raised mound vs lower mound on the buffalo).
 
The designers get to revise the dies for corrections to designs, adding and correcting details, blemishes, or things that don't strike as expected.
 
Sometimes the mint just makes mistakes.
 
The mint runs the same design in different mints, and there are differences.
 
The 2000P Sacagawea has three different types: normal unc, goodacre finish, and boldy detailed feathers. One was a special metal finish for the designers coins, one was a design change for better strking.
 
Also mint marks used to be added to the dies, and there were often differences here. "Clear S and Filled S".
 
Now that the mint is using computers for design and text we may very well see less of this...


Posted By: silverhawk
Date Posted: 02 Nov 2006 at 9:34am
Originally posted by coldshot coldshot wrote:

Fugio the first coin authorized by the new congress?
  Yes.


Posted By: coin crazy!!
Date Posted: 02 Nov 2006 at 9:47am
that was it.Actually I think they were called moon tails and John apple tree.I know they were three different indians actually. 


Posted By: silverhawk
Date Posted: 02 Nov 2006 at 9:47am
Why no movie stars on our coins like on our stamps?
Congress sets coin designs, mostly, and they seem to like dead presidents. The mint director has authority after 25 years on any design, but they are not likely to risk adding a movie star.
 
Why aren't coins made of a material that glows in the dark so you can find them when they fall in my garage?
To keep you crawling around.
 
Why aren't US coins and currency made in denomiations that all stores would be happy with such as $1.99, $2.99, $3.99, etc.?
Walmart threw a wrench in that by pricing everything $x.97.
 
Who was the Indian that posed for the Indian Head Nickel?
Iron Tail + Two Moons and possibly Big Tree
 
And who was the Buffalo on the reverse of that nickel?
Black Diamond
 
Is there any significance to why Liberty is either sitting, standing or walking on our coins?
Artistic decision by designers/engravers. Liberty is in bust, seated, walking, standing etc to fit different designs or visions of the engravers. Sometimes they like standing to show strength or power.
 
Why is Liberty holding a shield on the Standing Liberty Quarter?
A sign of strength and defense of our nation in tough times.
 
How many member will there be on this forum in ten years?
About 7500 or so


Posted By: BigRod
Date Posted: 02 Nov 2006 at 9:50am
There are many colorized coins on the market. Some advertise they are "Layered" or electroplated with silver, gold, or platinum. Do these coins have any long term collectible value? Or are they just more or less souvenirs?

I just spent a ton on air tite holders for my growing collection. How are these viewed for the long term, in respect to protecting my coins?

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Traveling twice the speed of sound,
Its easy to get burned...


Posted By: silverhawk
Date Posted: 02 Nov 2006 at 10:00am
There are many colorized coins on the market. Some advertise they are "Layered" or electroplated with silver, gold, or platinum. Do these coins have any long term collectible value? Or are they just more or less souvenirs?

I just spent a ton on air tite holders for my growing collection. How are these viewed for the long term, in respect to protecting my coins?
 
Most people consider colored coins to be souvenirs, most if not all don't seem to grow in value.
 
Airtites are respected and should do fine for you. I personally try to keep any soft rubber or plastic from touching my coins, and use a hard plastic case instead. But airtites are widely used. They also now offer "direct fit".
 


Posted By: coin crazy!!
Date Posted: 02 Nov 2006 at 10:57am
do coin values raise with the silver and gold value.I've heard that a couple of times.


Posted By: coldshot
Date Posted: 02 Nov 2006 at 11:24am
How long before the liberal's take the motto off of our money?

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Life is worth the living, Just because he lives


Posted By: coldshot
Date Posted: 02 Nov 2006 at 11:35am
Originally posted by coin crazy!! coin crazy!! wrote:

do coin values raise with the silver and gold value.I've heard that a couple of times.

It appear's to me the coin industry is a market of it's own and does not follow the metal market?

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Life is worth the living, Just because he lives


Posted By: GDJMSP
Date Posted: 02 Nov 2006 at 12:34pm
Originally posted by coin crazy!! coin crazy!! wrote:

do coin values raise with the silver and gold value.I've heard that a couple of times.
 
They do to a degree, but typically only when the value of the coin is very close to the value of its bullion content.


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knowledge ...... share it


Posted By: GDJMSP
Date Posted: 02 Nov 2006 at 12:37pm
Originally posted by coldshot coldshot wrote:

How long before the liberal's take the motto off of our money?
 
 
If I have anything to say about it - never.  A brief article I wrote on the subject a few years ago -
 
 

"IN GOD WE TRUST"


Few things have ever created so much and such long-lived controversy in the history of our nation as those four little words. Those four words are one of the Official Mottoes of the United States of America. The other is E Pluribus Unum. And as such they appear on every coin and every Federal Reserve note produced in our nation today.

The nation is divided into two basic camps regarding this subject; those who think the Motto should be changed and removed from our coins and currency; and those who think it should remain. Both camps have their reasons for their ideals and both are resolutely certain that their ideal is the correct one.

Those who wish the Motto to be changed and removed base their thinking on the idea of the separation of church & state and claim that such a Motto is not a part of our nation's heritage. That it is but a recent addition and as such had no place in the founding of our nation. And that based on the idea of the separation of church & state such a Motto is unconstitutional. Those who wish the Motto to remain unchanged refute these claims in every way. It is a difficult subject for many people to consider in which camp they belong. For others, they have no problem. They know on which side of the fence they stand and defend their position with vigor.

A simple search of the Internet for the words "In God We Trust" will bring up enough links on both sides of the issue to keep a person reading for weeks. But for myself there are really only two questions that need asking. Is the Motto actually rooted in the very beginnings of our nation's heritage? And does the Motto contradict the idea of the separation of church & state?

The first question is easily answered for me. There were 56 men who signed the Declaration of Independence in 1776 - the very beginning of our nation. This is the pledge that those 56 men made - "For the support of this declaration, with firm reliance on the protection of the divine providence, we mutually pledge to each other, our lives, our fortunes, and our sacred honor." It seems rather hard to argue that "In God We Trust" and "firm reliance on the protection of the divine providence" do not convey the same meaning. And how much further back can you go into our nation's heritage than the signing of the Declaration of Independence?

Then of course you can examine our National Anthem - written in 1814. The words of the third from the last line of the fourth stanza are - "And this is our motto - 'In God is our Trust!" Now somebody will say those words are not in our National Anthem. But "The Star Spangled Banner" is actually a poem that was put to music. And only the first stanza of the poem was used in the song.

So it seems to me that when Congress decided to place the Motto "In God We Trust" on some of our coins back in the 1860's they were only too aware of just how much those words are a part of our nation's heritage. Perhaps we have forgotten it.

As for the second question; this nation was founded on the idea of freedom of religion. Because at the time, in most nations of the world there was only one religion acceptable in any given nation -that being the State Religion of the given nation. And the founders of our nation wanted to make sure that was not the case here - which they did.

The First Amendment of the Constitution states - "Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof......" Seems rather obvious to me what that means. That the Congress shall not make any law that establishes a State Religion. That is what is meant by and what was intended by our founding fathers to maintain a separation of church & state.

Perhaps - we have forgotten too much.

 
 
 


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knowledge ...... share it


Posted By: GDJMSP
Date Posted: 02 Nov 2006 at 12:42pm
Originally posted by coldshot coldshot wrote:

Originally posted by coin crazy!! coin crazy!! wrote:

do coin values raise with the silver and gold value.I've heard that a couple of times.

It appear's to me the coin industry is a market of it's own and does not follow the metal market?
 
 
Absolutely, that is because the value of a given coin is based on its numismatic value and not its bullion content.


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knowledge ...... share it


Posted By: silverhawk
Date Posted: 02 Nov 2006 at 1:48pm
Originally posted by coin crazy!! coin crazy!! wrote:

do coin values raise with the silver and gold value.I've heard that a couple of times.
 
Silver and Gold can have a direct impact on many coins. St Gaudens went up with gold, and stayed (to some extent) even when gold dropped. These coins also went up MORE than gold did as people wanted to grab higher grades. Those coins whose values are largely bullion based (American eagles for instance) are directly impacted.
 
Others with true collector (or numismatic value) are largely unaffected.


Posted By: silverhawk
Date Posted: 02 Nov 2006 at 1:51pm
Nice job, GDJMSP


Posted By: coin crazy!!
Date Posted: 02 Nov 2006 at 2:06pm
Okay,how about the most vauble coin.Or the highest  record  coin sold?


Posted By: GDJMSP
Date Posted: 02 Nov 2006 at 2:16pm
Originally posted by coin crazy!! coin crazy!! wrote:

Okay,how about the most vauble coin.Or the highest  record  coin sold?
 
 
They are two different things - highest price paid was for the '33 double eagle - $7,590,020
 
So far anyway, most valuable coin is a 1000 mohur of Jahangir. In 1987 it went up for auction, bid reached $10 million, but the owner turned it down as too low.
 
http://www.columbia.edu/itc/mealac/pritchett/00routesdata/1600_1699/jahangir/hugecoin/hugecoin.html - http://www.columbia.edu/itc/mealac/pritchett/00routesdata/1600_1699/jahangir/hugecoin/hugecoin.html


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knowledge ...... share it


Posted By: coin crazy!!
Date Posted: 02 Nov 2006 at 2:19pm

Wow,that is high.



Posted By: coldshot
Date Posted: 03 Nov 2006 at 3:53am
Originally posted by coin crazy!! coin crazy!! wrote:

do coin values raise with the silver and gold value.I've heard that a couple of times.

When gold was between 6 and 700.00 gold buffs first strike NGC ms 70 were 750.00 now gold is down and the buff's are up. This is an interesting subject.

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Life is worth the living, Just because he lives


Posted By: coldshot
Date Posted: 03 Nov 2006 at 3:55am
Good job Silverhawk this is the best folder here.

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Life is worth the living, Just because he lives


Posted By: coldshot
Date Posted: 03 Nov 2006 at 4:04am
Why was the motto left off of some St Gauden's?
What is wire rim on a coin?
What is high relief?
What is a TOP POP coin?
Why will no one give me a St Gauden's any condition?
When money is completly out of use and circulation will we still collect coin's or collect old credit card's?

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Life is worth the living, Just because he lives


Posted By: josie
Date Posted: 03 Nov 2006 at 7:23am
Novice queation from novice like me.
 
Seen interesting topichere, Having problem deducting this but here it goes.
 
Govt-mint- collector or investor-grading comp.-auction house-insurance-coinmarket-currency-Govt
 
when a mint relaese a coin for sale for collector and investor they buy it more or less their face value,
 
then a coll. or invst. find an error more than thier face value then graded more tha again there face value. then the govt. tax the comp.
 
then the coll. sold the coin to the auction house both tax by the govt. again. the coin in transit insured and the govt tax the insurane company.
 
then the collector insured the coin at home tax again.
 
for that piece of metal that is insured already a monetary value of its own,
what is the real price of the coin specailly the highly collectable and expensive and slab?
 
It is just a metal or it is already a currency of the state of its own for all the process it went through?
 
Also for raw coins highly collectible and expensive but not insured and slab what is thier value?
 
And for coin raw and slab both expensive and insured what is thier value are they a currency or just a piece of metal?
 
Just thinking slab and insured coin can contribute to the purchasing value of dollar,or  it must have the market.
 
What happen hypothetical. very few people buy or collect coin what happen to the insured and slab coins with high value.?
 
 
 


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One can be trusted in small things can be also trusted in bigger things


Posted By: coin crazy!!
Date Posted: 03 Nov 2006 at 7:49am
I high relief I think is the lettering in a coin that shows up more.Like the words on a Eisenhower dollar.On the Back  the words"In god we trust"The words are thicker.Just giving an thought.
 
Note from Silverhawk: Those would be different types. Relief can describe the design, but high relief is a specific design with extra high and low details, and possibly special striking to create a "deep" design.


Posted By: just carl
Date Posted: 03 Nov 2006 at 1:24pm
Originally posted by silverhawk silverhawk wrote:

Nice job, GDJMSP
I'll second that. Great article.


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just carl


Posted By: just carl
Date Posted: 03 Nov 2006 at 1:32pm
OK now here is one I don't know why and when I hear some reason it is just to hard to believe. We have so many coins in our monitary system with over dates. Example is the 42/41 or 42D/41 Merc Dime. Or 1918/17 Buffalo Nickel. There are numerous others and more being discovered all the time. Why would the Mint do that? Why not just not make coins that year? Why would anyone spend the time aligning a Dime to put a new date on it? How can anyone put a value on such a coin when there is no record of the quantity Minted? Has the Mint ever admitted doing this and for what reason?

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just carl


Posted By: silverhawk
Date Posted: 04 Nov 2006 at 12:27am
Why was the motto left off of some St Gauden's?
President Theodore Roosevelt was personally involved in the redesign of American coinage, and wanted our coinage to have the beauty of classic Greek coins, etc. He personally objected to the motto being included, as he thought that it bordered on sacreligious and people care for it anyway. In addition (my opinion), he may have also wanted a more pure design with fewer words.

What is wire rim on a coin?
The thin, knife-like projection seen on some rims created when metal flows between the collar and the dies. Also, slang for the Wire Edge Indian Head eagle of 1907.

 
What is high relief?
Any coin that is designed with extra high and low spots in the design to produce more of a 3D effect. The most famous are the high relief and ultra high relief St Gaudens $20 gold coins. The 1921 peace dollar had a somewhat high relief as well. It was changed in 1922 to allow for better striking and stacking. High relief coins are harder to strike, and can take several impressions to achieve the effect.

 
What is a TOP POP coin?
Also known as POP TOP, this is a coin that is at the top of the population charts for known graded samples. So let's say that the highest graded known coin for a series is MS66 (like a large cent or something). That coin is a Pop top, no know samples graded higher. These are premium coins and usually command significant money, if the series is rare.
 
Why will no one give me a St Gauden's any condition?
The gold content keeps even AG coins high priced and people typically hoard money. But, about once a year Heritage or other coin companies hold drawings for St Gaudens $20 Double Eagles, so SIGN UP!
 
When money is completly out of use and circulation will we still collect coin's or collect old credit card's?
I think that people will collect both and coins will go much higher in value.
 
 


Posted By: silverhawk
Date Posted: 04 Nov 2006 at 12:47am
Govt-mint- collector or investor-grading comp.-auction house-insurance-coinmarket-currency-Govt.  when a mint relaese a coin for sale for collector and investor they buy it more or less their face value,  then a coll. or invst. find an error more than thier face value then graded more tha again there face value. then the govt. tax the comp. then the coll. sold the coin to the auction house both tax by the govt. again. the coin in transit insured and the govt tax the insurane company. then the collector insured the coin at home tax again. for that piece of metal that is insured already a monetary value of its own,
 
what is the real price of the coin specailly the highly collectable and expensive and slab?
 
The government issues coins with a face value (like $10), because if it is a true government issue it MUST be monetized (usable as money) and what we call "legal tender". This means the coin is backed by our government. In the old  days the goverment used to make the metal value (or bullion value) of the coin close to the monetized value. What they found was that when the bullion value (gold silver copper) went over the face value, people melted the coins for the gold silver etc. So NOW the government makes coins with MUCH LESS precious metal value than the face value. And guess what? The government gets to KEEP the profits from doing this. This is called Seigniorage. If some of these terms don't make sense please look them up for additional clarity. So now we have commemorative coins that may cost $15 to make but the goverment sells them for $33. The coin has a face value of $1 as an example.
 
Most collectible coins have a market value based on their rarity and desirability NOT the face value or previous metal content.  Many people use the Greysheet to track this value (or Coin Values from CoinWorld).
 
It is just a metal or it is already a currency of the state of its own for all the process it went through?
 
Coins have a face value that the government backs, usually much less than the actual value. Coins also have a precious metal value. This value fluctuates with the price of silver gold, etc. AND coins have collectible value.
 
Also for raw coins highly collectible and expensive but not insured and slab what is thier value?
 
Insurance is a good idea, but does not effect value. Most people use http://www.greysheet.com - www.greysheet.com to track coin values.
 
Also check here: http://www.coinforum.org/forum_posts.asp?TID=525 - http://www.coinforum.org/forum_posts.asp?TID=525
 
And for coin raw and slab both expensive and insured what is thier value are they a currency or just a piece of metal?
 
A slabbed coin may have additional value for several reasons: It has a certified grade or quality (if the slab company is good), it cost money to slab it, the slab authenticates the coin (if the grading conpany is good), and for the best graing companies: the grade may be proven rare.
 
Some respected grading companies: PCGS, NGC, ANACS, ICG.
 
What happen hypothetical. very few people buy or collect coin what happen to the insured and slab coins with high value.?
 
If many fewer people buy coins, coin prices should go down. However, truly rare coins may not because the owners of these coins presumably have money and KNOW what they have is rare.  So common coins would tend to drop but not truly rare coins.


Posted By: silverhawk
Date Posted: 04 Nov 2006 at 12:56am
Originally posted by just carl just carl wrote:

OK now here is one I don't know why and when I hear some reason it is just to hard to believe. We have so many coins in our monitary system with over dates. Example is the 42/41 or 42D/41 Merc Dime. Or 1918/17 Buffalo Nickel. There are numerous others and more being discovered all the time. Why would the Mint do that? Why not just not make coins that year? Why would anyone spend the time aligning a Dime to put a new date on it? How can anyone put a value on such a coin when there is no record of the quantity Minted? Has the Mint ever admitted doing this and for what reason?
 
There were no strict rules over quality controls, and expediency ruled the day. Die making and hub making was much more manual.
 
From PCGS.com

In the early days dies were cut by hand. By means of an engraving tool the die cutter would create the figure of Miss Liberty, an eagle, or other motif. Letters and numerals would be added to the die individually by means of punches. Certain other punches were used for elements as leaves and berries. Each die was slightly different from all others. The collecting of coins made by different dies is a fascinating pursuit. Sometimes a die would last long enough to make tens of thousands of coins before it broke, and thus coins from such a die are easy to find today. In other instances a die would break shortly after it was first used, only a few pieces would be struck from it, and today that particular die variety is rare.

Beginning about the year 1836 the preparation of dies was mechanized, and the lettering, eagle, figure of Miss Liberty, and everything else but the date was stamped on the die from a master die or hub. The date figures were then added individually. Soon thereafter, logotypes consisting of an entire date, such as 1898, were made, and the date was then punched in all at once, rather than individual date punches. Still later, the date was included in the master die, and all working dies were stamped with all information on them -including the date, design, and lettering. That is the way dies are produced today. Consequently, there are relatively few die variety differences among modern coins.



Posted By: Amanda
Date Posted: 04 Nov 2006 at 2:47am
Originally posted by just carl just carl wrote:

OK now here is one I don't know why and when I hear some reason it is just to hard to believe. We have so many coins in our monitary system with over dates. Example is the 42/41 or 42D/41 Merc Dime. Or 1918/17 Buffalo Nickel. There are numerous others and more being discovered all the time. Why would the Mint do that? Why not just not make coins that year? Why would anyone spend the time aligning a Dime to put a new date on it? How can anyone put a value on such a coin when there is no record of the quantity Minted? Has the Mint ever admitted doing this and for what reason?


With regards to the 1918/17 D buffalo nickel (and SLQ), these dies were being made in 1917 by new employees. Many young men had gone off to Europe to go fight in the war and the Philadelphia mint was understaffed and so was unable to properly train the new help. The dies for 1917 were being made quickly along with dies for 1918 in anticipation of future steel shortages. During the annealing process, one die for 1917 was overpunched with a 1918 date. This was then shipped to Denver where it was put into use.

There was a great coin shortage during this time, so the mint was working feverishly to meet current and expected demands.

I hope this helps.

-Amanda


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http://www.geocities.com/quirkybuffalos - My Buffalo Nickel Website


Posted By: josie
Date Posted: 04 Nov 2006 at 3:41am

THANK YOU SILVERHAWK and for the new info.

 



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One can be trusted in small things can be also trusted in bigger things


Posted By: coldshot
Date Posted: 04 Nov 2006 at 4:28am
NNC has a process to preserve coin's before they are graded and slabbed. What does this process consist of?
 
[Editors note: NCS is a conservation service, NNC is a lesser known grading service]


Posted By: GDJMSP
Date Posted: 04 Nov 2006 at 7:32am
Originally posted by just carl just carl wrote:

OK now here is one I don't know why and when I hear some reason it is just to hard to believe. We have so many coins in our monitary system with over dates. Example is the 42/41 or 42D/41 Merc Dime. Or 1918/17 Buffalo Nickel. There are numerous others and more being discovered all the time. Why would the Mint do that? Why not just not make coins that year? Why would anyone spend the time aligning a Dime to put a new date on it? How can anyone put a value on such a coin when there is no record of the quantity Minted? Has the Mint ever admitted doing this and for what reason?
 
 
Yes the mint has admitted it and has also provided the explanation, it's quite simple really - to save money.
 
The quote Silver Hawk provided explains how the dies were made. But at the end of a year, if some of those dies that were already made were left over the mint did not want to just throw them away and make new ones. So they would take a date punch with the new date on it - punch the new date into the die right over top of the old date - and thus we have an overdate coin.


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knowledge ...... share it


Posted By: silverhawk
Date Posted: 04 Nov 2006 at 8:37am
Originally posted by coldshot coldshot wrote:

NNC has a process to preserve coin's before they are graded and slabbed. What does this process consist of?
 
Do you mean NCS?


Posted By: coldshot
Date Posted: 04 Nov 2006 at 12:25pm
yes it is the name. sorry

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Life is worth the living, Just because he lives


Posted By: coin crazy!!
Date Posted: 04 Nov 2006 at 12:28pm
okay,how about the first mint estibalished?Or what year?


Posted By: silverhawk
Date Posted: 04 Nov 2006 at 12:34pm
Originally posted by coin crazy!! coin crazy!! wrote:

okay,how about the first mint estibalished?Or what year?
 
History of the Mint
"The Congress shall have the Power . . . To Coin Money."
(Constitution of the United States, Article I, Section 8.)

When the framers of the U.S. Constitution created a new government for their untried Republic, they realized the critical need for a respected monetary system. Soon after the Constitution's ratification, Secretary of the Treasury Alexander Hamilton personally prepared plans for a national Mint. On April 2, 1792, Congress passed The Coinage Act, which created the Mint and authorized construction of a Mint building in the nation's capitol, Philadelphia. This was the first federal building erected under the Constitution.

David%20Rittenhouse%20Portrait
David Rittenhouse
First Director of the
United States Mint

President George Washington appointed Philadelphian David Rittenhouse, a leading American scientist, as the first Director of the Mint. Under Rittenhouse, the Mint produced its first circulating coins -- 11,178 copper cents, which were delivered in March 1793. Soon after, the Mint began issuing gold and silver coins as well. President Washington, who lived only a few blocks from the new Mint, is believed to have donated some of his own silver for minting.



Posted By: coin crazy!!
Date Posted: 04 Nov 2006 at 12:40pm
wow,that is great information.Okay here another:what person is on the indian penny?And also who was the engraver and maker?


Posted By: silverhawk
Date Posted: 04 Nov 2006 at 12:44pm
Originally posted by coldshot coldshot wrote:

NNC has a process to preserve coin's before they are graded and slabbed. What does this process consist of?
 
[Editors note: NCS is aconservation service, NNC is a lesser knowngrading service]
 
NCS (ncscoin.com) is a numismatic coin conservation service that utilizes a number of preservation and restoration techniques for problem coins. Many positive results can be experienced, although outcomes are not guaranteed. Primary means are controlled use of chemicals.
 
Here is a reference book: http://app.coinresource.com/shop.php?c=B01&n=1000&i=0971392471&x=Coin_Chemistry_Including_Cleaning_and_Preservation - http://app.coinresource.com/shop.php?c=B01&n=1000&i=0971392471&x=Coin_Chemistry_Including_Cleaning_and_Preservation
 
Many chemicals are EXTREMELY harsh.
 
People do clean their own coins at home, but inexperienced people can hurt themselves or damage the coins. Care is required.
 
 


Posted By: silverhawk
Date Posted: 04 Nov 2006 at 12:52pm
Originally posted by coin crazy!! coin crazy!! wrote:

wow,that is great information.Okay here another:what person is on the indian penny?And also who was the engraver and maker?
 
The design is Lady Liberty with an Indian Headress.
 
There is no authenticated model for Lady Liberty. It was designed by James Barton Longacre, the Engraver at the Philadelphia Mint. Some folks supposed that Longacre used his daughter, but this is NOT confirmed at all.


Posted By: coin crazy!!
Date Posted: 04 Nov 2006 at 1:04pm
is most 1936 proof sets not real?I got one and sent it back,one because it said on a certifacate it said set of Authenticated and the cins said copies?why would they say it was real and the coins were not?


Posted By: silverhawk
Date Posted: 04 Nov 2006 at 1:13pm
Originally posted by coin crazy!! coin crazy!! wrote:

is most 1936 proof sets not real?I got one and sent it back,one because it said on a certifacate it said set of Authenticated and the cins said copies?why would they say it was real and the coins were not?
 
Real 1936 Proof Sets cost $7,000.00 ++.
 
For expensive coins, some companies make replicas for collectors that cannot afford the genuine sets. So, please do take care and read the fine print on any offer. There are modern (private) mints that make only replicas. Now by law, the back of each replica must have the word 'Copy' prominently displayed. You can buy 1804 Dollar copies cheap this was for instance. 1936 proof sets can be found but are hard to come by.


Posted By: coin crazy!!
Date Posted: 04 Nov 2006 at 1:28pm

why weren't any peace dollars made between 1925-1933?And I heard they did make 1960's peace dollars but melted them?



Posted By: Amanda
Date Posted: 04 Nov 2006 at 1:50pm
Originally posted by coin crazy!! coin crazy!! wrote:

why weren't any peace dollars made between 1925-1933?And I heard they did make 1960's peace dollars but melted them?



They didn't make Peace Dollars dated 1929-1933. I can only surmise that this part of this was because of the Great Depression (starting in Oct. 1929) and part of it was a lack of demand as well. 1928 had a low mintage.

From coinfacts.com:

In 1964, the Denver Mint struck 316,076 Peace Dollars but, before they were released into circulation, all of the coins were destroyed.  A few may have been purchased or "taken" by Mint employees and rumors persist of this coin's existence.  However, for fear of confiscation by Treasury officials, none have yet appeared on the market.  Were it legal to own, the 1964-D Peace Dollar would become one of the most valuable of all United States coins.

-Amanda




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http://www.geocities.com/quirkybuffalos - My Buffalo Nickel Website


Posted By: silverhawk
Date Posted: 04 Nov 2006 at 1:55pm
They only issued silver dollars when there was demand or need in the marketplace. So there were gaps, including a gap until 1964 (as people didn't really need silver dollars (except maybe casinos.) So in 1964 they decided more silver dollars were needed and minted some, then the government had a change of heart, metled them all, and switched to clad coinage due to rising metal prices.


Posted By: coin crazy!!
Date Posted: 04 Nov 2006 at 2:13pm
Okay,what is the rarest coin?


Posted By: silverhawk
Date Posted: 05 Nov 2006 at 12:32am
Originally posted by coin crazy!! coin crazy!! wrote:

Okay,what is the rarest coin?
 
I am going to answer for US Coins, in which I specialize. By rare I am going to suppose you mean fewset surviving examples.
 
Unique (meaning one):
 
NE Three pence
St Patrick Farthing in Gold
1737Higley Copper the wheel goes round
1776 pine tree copper
1776 indian copper
1776 half penny 3 heads
1787 Brasher Doubloon (eb on wing + eb on breast)
others...
G.W Pt. White metal
1792 Half disme in copper
 
Many of the more famous coins actually have multiple minted coins (1933 Double eagle, etc.)
 
Ther king of Siam set is a true rarity also:
http://www.ngccoin.com/gallery/king.asp - http://www.ngccoin.com/gallery/king.asp
 
And, the Amazing Amazonian Patterns:
http://coins.heritageauctions.com/features/amazonian.php - http://coins.heritageauctions.com/features/amazonian.php
 


Posted By: coin crazy!!
Date Posted: 05 Nov 2006 at 12:47am
yeah,thats what I ment.


Posted By: coldshot
Date Posted: 05 Nov 2006 at 1:08am
Originally posted by coin crazy!! coin crazy!! wrote:

Okay,what is the rarest coin?


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Life is worth the living, Just because he lives


Posted By: coin crazy!!
Date Posted: 05 Nov 2006 at 1:22am
thats a nice coin.let me see,how about who is the founder of NCS?


Posted By: silverhawk
Date Posted: 05 Nov 2006 at 1:56am
Originally posted by coin crazy!! coin crazy!! wrote:

thats a nice coin.let me see,how about who is the founder of NCS?
 
I am assuming NGC the company founded NCS, but could be wrong...


Posted By: coldshot
Date Posted: 05 Nov 2006 at 2:24am
NCS is a subsidiary (or branch) of NGC

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Life is worth the living, Just because he lives


Posted By: coldshot
Date Posted: 05 Nov 2006 at 2:27am
NCS tries to make old bad condition coin's into something that will have a collector's value if it is not worth sending in to grade they put a net grade on the coin. If it comes out better they send it to NGC for actual grading. (i think)

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Life is worth the living, Just because he lives


Posted By: coldshot
Date Posted: 05 Nov 2006 at 2:32am
If PCGS list a coin in their price guide at 20.000.00 it will only retail for a few hundred at the most unless you sell through teletrade or heritage or any LARGE auction house. So if coin's never sell for what the price list is at why have PCGS price list? It seems point less except for deasler's that can say well I will let you have this for 200 but it list for 10 thou. Why is PCGS price list so far off of actual seller's value?

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Life is worth the living, Just because he lives


Posted By: coin crazy!!
Date Posted: 05 Nov 2006 at 2:47am
I've noticed that also.Maybe the PCGS price might be alot more than actual price and the dealers maybe think that they might have more people come?


Posted By: coldshot
Date Posted: 05 Nov 2006 at 2:59am
The price list in my mind is all hype! Like first strike coin's is hype! They consider all coin's from the first thirty day's of production to be first strike, when in reality there is only ONE first strike and it does not leave the mint. ALL HYPE for higher prices.


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Life is worth the living, Just because he lives


Posted By: GDJMSP
Date Posted: 05 Nov 2006 at 3:48am
Originally posted by coldshot coldshot wrote:

If PCGS list a coin in their price guide at 20.000.00 it will only retail for a few hundred at the most unless you sell through teletrade or heritage or any LARGE auction house. So if coin's never sell for what the price list is at why have PCGS price list? It seems point less except for deasler's that can say well I will let you have this for 200 but it list for 10 thou. Why is PCGS price list so far off of actual seller's value?
 
 
They do it to get inexperienced collectors excited and think that they have something worth a lot more than it really is. This cause the inexperienced collectors to purchase even more coins. And the purchase of more and more coins leads to more and more submissions by the dealers and the experienced collectors.
 
In other words, it creates a market for the service PCGS provides. Marketing technique - that's all it is.


-------------
knowledge ...... share it


Posted By: silverhawk
Date Posted: 05 Nov 2006 at 6:44am
Originally posted by coldshot coldshot wrote:

If PCGS list a coin in their price guide at 20.000.00 it will only retail for a few hundred at the most unless you sell through teletrade or heritage or any LARGE auction house. So if coin's never sell for what the price list is at why have PCGS price list? It seems point less except for deasler's that can say well I will let you have this for 200 but it list for 10 thou. Why is PCGS price list so far off of actual seller's value?
 
The PCGS guide is ONLY for PCGS coins. Many people improperly use it to price NGC coins, raw coins, ICG coins etc.
 
PCGS has STRICT standards they use. Other may or may not. So that it why you will see an ACG coin got for $350, when a PCGS will bring $8,000.
 
NOW, it is true that the PCGS guide was off, and not updated properly in the past; however now they update it all the time, and have made corrections so it is much closer.
 
Go look at some auctions at Heritage and you will see that PCGS brings better money for the same grade than anyone else.


Posted By: silverhawk
Date Posted: 05 Nov 2006 at 6:46am
Originally posted by GDJMSP GDJMSP wrote:

Originally posted by coldshot coldshot wrote:

If PCGS list a coin in their price guide at 20.000.00 it will only retail for a few hundred at the most unless you sell through teletrade or heritage or any LARGE auction house. So if coin's never sell for what the price list is at why have PCGS price list? It seems point less except for deasler's that can say well I will let you have this for 200 but it list for 10 thou. Why is PCGS price list so far off of actual seller's value?
 
 
They do it to get inexperienced collectors excited and think that they have something worth a lot more than it really is. This cause the inexperienced collectors to purchase even more coins. And the purchase of more and more coins leads to more and more submissions by the dealers and the experienced collectors.
 
In other words, it creates a market for the service PCGS provides. Marketing technique - that's all it is.
 
They do use it to help show the value of their service. Meaning it shows how much their coins can attract. However submissions are driven more by things like "First Strike" and registry fever (MS-70 Pop Top coins) than the price guide by far. 


Posted By: coldshot
Date Posted: 05 Nov 2006 at 7:02am
Good explanation. A bit easier to work with the price guide now. I just saw their video on coin grading. Kind of interesting. Would be a cool job grading coin's.

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Life is worth the living, Just because he lives


Posted By: orchidseller
Date Posted: 05 Nov 2006 at 7:09am
Hello,
My 90 year old Father has a coin collection that he is interested in selling.  He has had to move to assisted living.  His coin collection is in a large cabinet that takes up a closet.  My husband and 2 sons moved this for him 3 years ago.  They are strong weightlifters and have a good knowledge of the weight of objects.  They feel the coin collection without the cabinet weighs about 1000 pounds!  Does anyone have any ideas on how to go about appraising this and selling it? 


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orchidseller


Posted By: silverhawk
Date Posted: 05 Nov 2006 at 7:35am
Originally posted by orchidseller orchidseller wrote:

Hello,
My 90 year old Father has a coin collection that he is interested in selling.  He has had to move to assisted living.  His coin collection is in a large cabinet that takes up a closet.  My husband and 2 sons moved this for him 3 years ago.  They are strong weightlifters and have a good knowledge of the weight of objects.  They feel the coin collection without the cabinet weighs about 1000 pounds!  Does anyone have any ideas on how to go about appraising this and selling it? 
 
This sounds like a big task.
 
FIRST - do NOT clean any coins. Do not handle them, dust them, wipe them, or dip them.
 
Second, carefully by the edges or using cotton gloves gather a section at a time and put them in some safe carrying box. Coins do NOT like humidity, cheap cardboard boxes, water, or other chemically active boxes. Try not to let the coins move around or scratch each other. Consider 2x2 coin holders or 2x2 flips.
 
Find a dealer you can TRUST. Using references, referrals, etc.
 
Have the coins appraised. Many may not be worth much.
 
Consider having a second review by another independent dealer.
 
Most coins are common so you may not have a fortune per se.
 
Do not broadcast to people what you have, robberies can occur if you spread the word too much.
 
You could also catalog the entire lot and send this list to multiple people as well, however, without grades and precise review of the coins, remote grading is not precise.
 
I can give you some referrals if you need. My company also appraises coins, but the weight you have may not justify shipping.
 
Do you have any idea of the types, condition or values? 
 
-silverhawk


Posted By: orchidseller
Date Posted: 05 Nov 2006 at 9:05am
Silverhawk,
Thank you for your helpful answer.  My Father does have the coins stored in real coin cases carefully as it has been a lifetime hobby.  His Mother also collected coins and he inherited her collection.  He has alot of mint sets he has bought over the years.  He gave my son 3 Morgan silver dollars several years ago.  My Father lives in TN, do you ever come to the collection to assess it?  He has loved this collection and is now either going to liquidate it himself or have his four adult children inherit it which means we would liquidate it to divide it evenly.
Thank you so much.
Orchidseller


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orchidseller


Posted By: silverhawk
Date Posted: 05 Nov 2006 at 10:14am
That being the case you may have some gems in there then.  Most people that travel would want some guarantee on the total value (could they cover the travel expenses in reselling the collection?)
 
So yes there are several dealers, myself included, that travel to sites to evaluate.
 
Another thing that can help is to look for dealers that are ANA or PNG members. Not a guarantee, but these groups do have a code of ethics.


Posted By: coldshot
Date Posted: 06 Nov 2006 at 2:02am
If only I could afford to get in on a deal like that! Would be alot of fun going through drawers of old coinage. Should just give me some for being a good guy....lol....good luck with the coin's friend....

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Life is worth the living, Just because he lives


Posted By: just carl
Date Posted: 06 Nov 2006 at 7:22am
Originally posted by coldshot coldshot wrote:

If PCGS list a coin in their price guide at 20.000.00 it will only retail for a few hundred at the most unless you sell through teletrade or heritage or any LARGE auction house. So if coin's never sell for what the price list is at why have PCGS price list? It seems point less except for deasler's that can say well I will let you have this for 200 but it list for 10 thou. Why is PCGS price list so far off of actual seller's value?
 Try to remember that all such price lists are in reality only a guide. You too could make a price guide and put down anything you want for prices. All of them are just guides. There is no manufacturer's list price, no factory listing, no true evaluation on coins. They are what they are, GUIDES.


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just carl


Posted By: just carl
Date Posted: 06 Nov 2006 at 7:28am
Originally posted by orchidseller orchidseller wrote:

Silverhawk,
Thank you for your helpful answer.  My Father does have the coins stored in real coin cases carefully as it has been a lifetime hobby.  His Mother also collected coins and he inherited her collection.  He has alot of mint sets he has bought over the years.  He gave my son 3 Morgan silver dollars several years ago.  My Father lives in TN, do you ever come to the collection to assess it?  He has loved this collection and is now either going to liquidate it himself or have his four adult children inherit it which means we would liquidate it to divide it evenly.
Thank you so much.
Orchidseller
Being a very old person myself, I find it scarry that someday my collection well be abandoned due to reasons like this. I really don't understand why a family tradition could not be started using these coins as a start. If splitting them up due to familly members not getting along, I've seen that before. I just hope than my collection becomes a family thing when my time comes. Not familiar with coin shows in TN but you may want to check to see if there are any there.


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just carl


Posted By: just carl
Date Posted: 06 Nov 2006 at 7:34am
Originally posted by silverhawk silverhawk wrote:

Originally posted by coin crazy!! coin crazy!! wrote:

Okay,what is the rarest coin?
 
I am going to answer for US Coins, in which I specialize. By rare I am going to suppose you mean fewset surviving examples.
 
Unique (meaning one):
 
NE Three pence
St Patrick Farthing in Gold
1737Higley Copper the wheel goes round
1776 pine tree copper
1776 indian copper
1776 half penny 3 heads
1787 Brasher Doubloon (eb on wing + eb on breast)
others...
G.W Pt. White metal
1792 Half disme in copper
 
Many of the more famous coins actually have multiple minted coins (1933 Double eagle, etc.)
 
Ther king of Siam set is a true rarity also:
http://www.ngccoin.com/gallery/king.asp - http://www.ngccoin.com/gallery/king.asp
 
And, the Amazing Amazonian Patterns:
http://coins.heritageauctions.com/features/amazonian.php - http://coins.heritageauctions.com/features/amazonian.php
 
 The problem with post like this is I now have to go back and look at my collection. None of the above are there. In fact none are even close to them. I think I'm always happier when someone just says I found a nickel on the ground and it has a buffalo on one side. He is missing a leg I think. Now I can relate to that kind of coin.


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just carl


Posted By: coldshot
Date Posted: 06 Nov 2006 at 7:50am
The Brasher Doubloon is a really cool coin. The Stella is one of my all time fav's. Just to hard to find and to high to reach.


Posted By: coppercoins
Date Posted: 06 Nov 2006 at 12:49pm
Rarity, rarity...there are thousands upon thousands of namable examples in coins for which there is only one surviving piece.  This makes them all equally rare.
 
Rarity alone isn't the key; desirability is.  I have a number of minor Lincoln cent repunched mintmarks for which there is only one known example, and I have it.  Does that make me the holder of a rare coin?  Yes.  Does anyone care?  No.  Not except for the few dozen collectors who would like to own one of them.  If it were one of the aforementioned coins that's 100 plus years old and has been displayed ad-nauseum in conventions and had article after article published about them, then yes...it would be something of importance to own.
 
When you focus on rarity alone you can easily lose sight of the fact that it takes a market to make anything valuable, and those markets are borne from knowledge and passion to write about the subject.  We have to have someone willing to step up to the plate, study a subject, learn from the coins themselves, then teach the world what they've learned.  Anyone reading this could be holding rare coins you don't even know are rare because you haven't studied your own collection to the point that you would know the difference.
 
That's my spiel - a bit disjointed, but still profound in and of itself.  If you want to be a part of the "rare coin market" step up to the plate, learn something about coins that hasn't been overpublished, get your feet wet, study, and write about your findings.  Don't sit around being a collector all your life just feeding from the knowledge numismatists give you - become a numismatist yourself!  Heck, if I did it anyone can.


-------------
C. D. Daughtrey, N.L.G.
owner,
http://www.coppercoins.com - coppercoins.com
Numismatic artist:
http://www.cdaughtrey.com - www.cdaughtrey.com



Posted By: coldshot
Date Posted: 07 Nov 2006 at 6:48am
If some one send's in a coin for grading and it is found to be counterfiet. What is done with the coin?


Posted By: coppercoins
Date Posted: 07 Nov 2006 at 10:06am
They send it back as counterfeit and won't slab it.

-------------
C. D. Daughtrey, N.L.G.
owner,
http://www.coppercoins.com - coppercoins.com
Numismatic artist:
http://www.cdaughtrey.com - www.cdaughtrey.com



Posted By: just carl
Date Posted: 08 Nov 2006 at 1:48am
Always glad to see coppercoins on a forum. Fantastic knowledge to be destributed.

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just carl


Posted By: coldshot
Date Posted: 09 Nov 2006 at 6:05am
In the area of morgan what is a long hock?


Posted By: Becky
Date Posted: 09 Nov 2006 at 6:34am
On the reverse, it is the center shaft of the arrow.
 
http://vamworld.wikispaces.com/1878-P+VAM-83 - http://vamworld.wikispaces.com/1878-P+VAM-83


Posted By: coldshot
Date Posted: 09 Nov 2006 at 7:55am
What is PQ?


Posted By: silverhawk
Date Posted: 09 Nov 2006 at 11:13am
Originally posted by coldshot coldshot wrote:

What is PQ?
  Premium Quality


Posted By: coldshot
Date Posted: 10 Nov 2006 at 12:42am
Every collector has at least one morgan silver dollar. What was the real name of this coin? It is not morgan he was only a designer......


Posted By: coldshot
Date Posted: 10 Nov 2006 at 1:07am
Hate to see a cool thread die but this one is almost out....bummer....I notice not many people particpate in stuff here...except the free contest....go look in grading I will post one there....I have read everything here and I am bored again.....


Posted By: Starwarsfreak
Date Posted: 10 Nov 2006 at 4:25am
Well, give it time coldshot.


I'll talk to an admin and maybe we can edit the rules for contests a little to get people to participate a little more.Big%20smile


-Rob


Posted By: coppercoins
Date Posted: 10 Nov 2006 at 4:28am
Originally posted by coldshot coldshot wrote:

Every collector has at least one morgan silver dollar. What was the real name of this coin? It is not morgan he was only a designer......
 
I have thousands upon thousands of coins - but not one silver dollar.  I have no interest in them at all.


-------------
C. D. Daughtrey, N.L.G.
owner,
http://www.coppercoins.com - coppercoins.com
Numismatic artist:
http://www.cdaughtrey.com - www.cdaughtrey.com



Posted By: Amanda
Date Posted: 10 Nov 2006 at 8:20am
Originally posted by coldshot coldshot wrote:

Every collector has at least one morgan silver dollar. What was the real name of this coin? It is not morgan he was only a designer......


The coin is traditionally called the Morgan Silver Dollar after the designer, George T. Morgan. I have read of it referred to as a Liberty Head dollar as well. Back when the coin circulated, it was commonly referred to as the Bland Dollar, not because of the design, but because of the act that provided for the coinage of silver-- The Bland-Allison Act.

-Amanda


-------------
http://www.geocities.com/quirkybuffalos - My Buffalo Nickel Website


Posted By: just carl
Date Posted: 10 Nov 2006 at 9:08am
Originally posted by coppercoins coppercoins wrote:

Originally posted by coldshot coldshot wrote:

Every collector has at least one morgan silver dollar. What was the real name of this coin? It is not morgan he was only a designer......
 
I have thousands upon thousands of coins - but not one silver dollar.  I have no interest in them at all.
 This is odd. I never thought about that before but I too have virtually thousands and thousands of coins and not one Silver Dollar. I used to have them when I was a kid from my Dad as an allowance but girls came first so the Silver Dollars went.


-------------
just carl


Posted By: just carl
Date Posted: 10 Nov 2006 at 9:20am
This question and answer post could get complicated. Who runs to findthe answers anyway. So here is my latest question.
Checking coins for errors I began noticing the leaves on the reverse of the old Quarters versus the leaves on the reverse of the Roosevelt Dime. On the Quarter the branch beneath the Eagle is split into 2 halves. There are 15 leaves on the left and 14 on the right. Any reason? What kind of branch is that?
On the Roosevelt Dime there are 2 separate branches on the reverse. One on each side of the staff. I think one of them appears to be the same type as on the Quarter. Is it?
Note on the left of the staff the branch has leaves 3, 3, 2, 3 from bottom to top. Right side is 2,2,1,3 bottom to top. Any reason?
On the left branch of the Dime there are 2 dots. Are they supposed to be flower buds? On the right there is also 2 dots that appear to be acorns. Are they?
And what is the significense to these branches?
So many of our US coins over the years have had some type of branch, wreath, bundle of twigs. Why?


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just carl


Posted By: GDJMSP
Date Posted: 10 Nov 2006 at 10:48am
Branches are almost always either oak or olive. Oak symbolizes strength, olive symbolizes peace or tranquility - one on one side and the other on the other side - peace but still strong. Shafts of wheat & corn symbolize proserity, arrows a willingness to go to war or the strength of the nation, the fasces, the same. The torch - the flame of liberty burning bright.
 
To the best of my knowledge the number of leaves has never symbolized anything. But stars, they have stood for the number of states. Even the symbol of Liberty herself, seated, standing, striding or just a bust - all of them have a meaning. And if you think of the dates on the coins and then consider historical events that were taking place at the time - those meanings become clear.


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knowledge ...... share it


Posted By: Woody
Date Posted: 11 Nov 2006 at 1:05am

Large Cent Questions

 

Why are some 1839 Large Cents called “Booby Head” and other 1839 Large Cents called “Silly Head”?

 

When grading Large Cents, what does N-6, N-7, S-191, ect. mean

 



Posted By: coldshot
Date Posted: 11 Nov 2006 at 4:34am
If a raw coin has been lightly cleaned will leaving it in the element's help in any coin recovery? Or is it permanantly damaged?


Posted By: Starwarsfreak
Date Posted: 11 Nov 2006 at 7:17am
Leaving it in the elements will not help restore the coin, but probably destroy it. You will have to just give the coin years and years to restore itself.

-Rob


Posted By: GDJMSP
Date Posted: 12 Nov 2006 at 3:50am
Originally posted by Starwarsfreak Starwarsfreak wrote:

Leaving it in the elements will not help restore the coin, but probably destroy it. You will have to just give the coin years and years to restore itself.

-Rob
 
 
The coin will never restore itself. The evidence of the cleaning, no matter how much time passes, will always be there for the trained eye to see. The coin may well re-tone, and this can help cover up the evidence of previous cleaning, but it will not make it go away.


-------------
knowledge ...... share it


Posted By: coldshot
Date Posted: 12 Nov 2006 at 6:17am
Is that any type of cleaning or are you refering to scrubbing or brushing? If I were to take an old nickel and dip it in acetone is the nick ruined or would it need to have been scrubbed to be noticably trashed?


Posted By: coldshot
Date Posted: 12 Nov 2006 at 6:17am
If it were dipped in E-Zest is it ruined?


Posted By: GDJMSP
Date Posted: 12 Nov 2006 at 8:00am

Dipping a coin, if done properly cannot always be detected. Over-dipping can be detected because it strips the luster off the coin. However, if a coin is of a certain age, say 50 years or more, and it has no toning - it is blast white - then it is a pretty good bet that the coin has been dipped. Most experts will tell you that up to 90% of older silver coins have been dipped at one time or another in the lifetime of the coin.

Harsh cleaning, or even a gentle wipe with a soft cloth can almost always be detected by an experienced eye - regardless of when it was done or if the coin has retoned or not.



-------------
knowledge ...... share it


Posted By: coldshot
Date Posted: 13 Nov 2006 at 7:27am
I see the standard's PCGS uses for coin grading and find it the best to learn by but where do they come up with such outrageous prices for their price guide?
Do they use coin prices from example 1945 and then follow the economy up to date for the increases?


Posted By: GDJMSP
Date Posted: 13 Nov 2006 at 1:04pm
There was a time when I actually tried to figure that out, so I checked all auction records I could find anywhere for a few given coins. In just about every case I was able to find 1 coin that sold for close to what the PCGS guide listed. Of course it was the absolute highest price ever recorded for that particular coin. And it didn't seem to matter that the next highest price ever recorded was anywhere from 20% - 50% less - with all others being even lower.

-------------
knowledge ...... share it


Posted By: just carl
Date Posted: 15 Nov 2006 at 9:26am
Originally posted by coldshot coldshot wrote:

I see the standard's PCGS uses for coin grading and find it the best to learn by but where do they come up with such outrageous prices for their price guide?
Do they use coin prices from example 1945 and then follow the economy up to date for the increases?
I too have always wondered if anyone at PCGS even knows that thier prices are off the wall. I once a long, long time ago went to that web site and posted that very question. As usual most answers were gibberish. As everyone knows though, there is no manuafacturers suggested retail price on coins to go by. No standardazation of a possible guide that would be universal. The PCGS prices are a guide and should always be thought of as just that, a guide. Then again there may be someone there that just wishes that their prices will take hold.
Probably the only way to find the real price of a coin is to put it under your pillow at night and see how much the coin fairy leaves you. LOL


-------------
just carl


Posted By: coldshot
Date Posted: 16 Nov 2006 at 12:45am
It wont work like that carl. When I was a kid I lost a tooth and put it under my pillow and woke up with a kennedy half dollar. So I put a coin under the pillow and woke up with dentures.


Posted By: coin crazy!!
Date Posted: 16 Nov 2006 at 1:48pm
What is the gold standard?



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